By Justine Calise, PhD Candidate, Hofstra-Northwell School of Medicine Speakers: Dr. Jesse Roth, MD, FACP, and Dr. Bettie Steinberg, PhD            Chances are, if you are a trainee in the sciences and thinking forward in advancing your career to the next level, you have probably heard of the elevator pitch. For most people the thought of crafting one is scary; the actual elevator ride is the
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Categories : Elevator pitch, NYC Science Communication (NYCSciComm), persuasion, soft skills

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By Leo Bear-McGuinness With the announcement of an Isaac Newton action/adventure film, Hollywood’s tradition of misrepresenting scientists has now become as fixed as a Newtonian Law When you picture the one of the greatest scientists and ‘father of physics’ Sir Isaac Newton, what do you see? Probably an elderly man, sitting beneath a tree, rubbing his recently bombarded, ridiculous wig? Well, Hollywood apparently sees something quite different. Following the announcement yesterday,
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Categories : Hollywood, Isaac Newton, Movie, Science

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  By Tristan Fehr and Yue Liu  This post is a guide for anyone who is interested in blogging for NYC Science Communication. It also serves as guidelines for self-editing and editorial board. For more information on blog submission, please refer to an earlier post here: We Want You to Blog for NYC Science Communication!   Article Scope Guidelines We accept submissions within several main categories: Career exploration within the
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Categories : Medical writing, NYC Science Communication (NYCSciComm)

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By Julija Hmeljak   Summer is my favorite season. I always feel that great things happen when it’s warm and light outside, unlike in gloomy February. Why am I talking about this? Because it was in the glorious summer of 2015 that Sir Tim Hunt, Nobel Laureate, made a clumsy “joke” at a conference dinner that caused an uproar amongst the scientific community and effectively truncated his career. He made a
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Categories : academia, gender bias, postdocs, publishing

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By Monika Buczek In the past decade, the human gut microbiome has has been implicated in many diseases, including but not limited to food allergies, celiac disease, diabetes, and certain autoimmune diseases as well as weight gain and obesity. However, study of the gut microbiome is slowed by a lack of adequate model systems in which to observe changes to both host and gut flora under certain conditions. Recently however,
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Categories : C. elegans, disease, E. coli, insulin, roundworm

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