By Tristan Fehr and Yue Liu  This post is a guide for anyone who is interested in blogging for NYC Science Communication. It also serves as guidelines for self-editing and editorial board. For more information on blog submission, please refer to an earlier post here: We Want You to Blog for NYC Science Communication!   Article Scope Guidelines We accept submissions within several main categories: Career exploration within the
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Categories : Medical writing, NYC Science Communication (NYCSciComm)

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By Julija Hmeljak   Summer is my favorite season. I always feel that great things happen when it’s warm and light outside, unlike in gloomy February. Why am I talking about this? Because it was in the glorious summer of 2015 that Sir Tim Hunt, Nobel Laureate, made a clumsy “joke” at a conference dinner that caused an uproar amongst the scientific community and effectively truncated his career. He made a
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Categories : academia, gender bias, postdocs, publishing

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By Monika Buczek In the past decade, the human gut microbiome has has been implicated in many diseases, including but not limited to food allergies, celiac disease, diabetes, and certain autoimmune diseases as well as weight gain and obesity. However, study of the gut microbiome is slowed by a lack of adequate model systems in which to observe changes to both host and gut flora under certain conditions. Recently however,
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Categories : C. elegans, disease, E. coli, insulin, roundworm

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By Julija Hmeljak I’m not going to lie; I am no computational biologist. Even though anything “omics” has been all the rage in cancer research for the past decade, I used to sit firmly on the “Genomics Papers Are Boring” train. But the day came when, out of necessity, I started reading papers on genomics, and the subject itself blew my little mind. Since cancer research occupies approximately 45 % of
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Categories : 2016, Cancer, Genomics, roundup

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  By Melissa A. Deri, PhD                 Overview This panel was organized by NYC Science Communication, with the support from The Office of Career Planning and Professional Development at The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, in order to provide an overview of medical communications, a look at what the job entails, and how to approach the current career landscape. The
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Categories : Medical writing, NYC Science Communication (NYCSciComm), Panel discussion, PhD career transition

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